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A HOME FOR LIVE MUSIC, THEATRE,
LITERATURE, COMEDY, FILM, VISUAL
ART, SCIENCE, CIRCUS, CABARET
AND ALL POINTS IN BETWEEN

Calendar

Aug
4
Sun
Cage/Fest
Aug 4 @ 11:00 am

Raising Arizona (1987)

Cage perfectly fits the bill for the Coen Brothers’ cartoon vision of southwestern tackiness, and it’s where we always tell a Nicolas Cage skeptic to begin their journey of Cage appreciation. The quirky, over-acting cartoon Cage feels right at home in the world of the Coen Brothers, and it seems criminal that they haven’t collaborated on any films since. Out of all the Coen’s films, Raising Arizona remains one of their most beloved efforts, and Cage is a very big part of that. Cage’s Herbert I. “Hi” McDunnough is a faulty, yet endearing repeat offender who’s trying his best to go the way of the straight and narrow. Even more charming is he and Holly Hunter’s relationship and genuine desire to have a family. Raising Arizona gives us some Cageisms that can be enjoyed by the whole family, and though early in his career, his performance here is phenomenal and and all-out to joy to watch.

Matchstick Men (2003)

This underrated Ridley Scott heist thriller exhibits Cage as a neurotic con man suffering from OCD, agoraphobia and germophobia. He’s nothing short of dazzling in his performance which features a myriad of stutters, spasms, and obscure rituals, in addition to a tic that causes him to yell “pixies” when surprised. Only Nicolas Cage is capable of this level of off the wall crazy, and he succeeds with flying colors. In addition to nailing the quirky side of the character, Cage also injects a healthy dose of pathos that shines through his relationship with his partner (played by Sam Rockwell) and his young daughter (Alison Lohman).

‘Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance’ (2012)

Cage’s second go-round as the flaming-skull superhero lets the actor unleash a lot of rage as he transforms into a vigilante phantom. Fun fact: He’s actually a little scarier when he’s just ol’ Johnny Blaze cackling madly than racing on a cycle from hell.

Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009)

Cage’s collaboration with filmmaking legend Werner Herzog is delightfully zany and highlighted with moments of surprising poetry. An unhinged cop is right within Cage’s wheelhouse, and the added element of drug addiction allows him to take his performances into majorly looney and overblown directions. The result is the most gleefully over-the-top Nicolas Cage since Leaving Las Vegas, which is very wonderful to behold. “Shoot him again! His soul is still dancing…”

Con Air (1997)

Cage’s southern badass Cameron Poe may be one of his most quoted creations — everyone’s got their impersonation of the whole “Put… the bunny… back… in the box” bit. We love the hair, the weird accent, and the cheesy catch phrases. What makes this performance standout is how Cage interacts with the diverse cast of actors ranging from Ving Rhames to Steve Buscemi and John Cusack to John freaking Malkovich; they really give Cage a lot to work against. The other thing that’s great about this performance is how Cage clearly has tongue wedged firmly within cheek and embraces the absurdity of this 90s action with arms wide open.

Raising Arizona (1987)

Cage perfectly fits the bill for the Coen Brothers’ cartoon vision of southwestern tackiness, and it’s where we always tell a Nicolas Cage skeptic to begin their journey of Cage appreciation. The quirky, over-acting cartoon Cage feels right at home in the world of the Coen Brothers, and it seems criminal that they haven’t collaborated on any films since. Out of all the Coen’s films, Raising Arizona remains one of their most beloved efforts, and Cage is a very big part of that. Cage’s Herbert I. “Hi” McDunnough is a faulty, yet endearing repeat offender who’s trying his best to go the way of the straight and narrow. Even more charming is he and Holly Hunter’s relationship and genuine desire to have a family. Raising Arizona gives us some Cageisms that can be enjoyed by the whole family, and though early in his career, his performance here is phenomenal and and all-out to joy to watch.

Aug
26
Mon
Cinema Day-Drop Dead Fred & The Picture of Dorian Gray
Aug 26 @ 7:00 pm

We have selected two films, shown back to back that explore our connections and obsession with youth.

Drop Dead Fred, tells the story of a young woman (Phoebe Cates) who finds her already unstable life rocked by the presence of a rambunctious imaginary friend from childhood (Rik Mayall).

In The Picture of Dorian Gray a corrupt young man (Hurd Hatfield) somehow keeps his youthful beauty, but a special painting gradually reveals his inner ugliness to all.

Enjoy these films in the relaxed environment of the Green Room, bar open throughout.

Sep
4
Wed
Film Devour
Sep 4 @ 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Film Devour Short Film Festival is committed to showing the best in local raw talent and creating a platform through which filmmakers can show off their stuff, meet other filmmakers and co-ordinate ideas. The festival caters to all kinds of filmmakers and genres. Showing first time shorts by filmmakers as well as films with a budget. The whole ethos of the festival is to showcase everything to everyone. It`s also a great opportunity to network with other filmmakers, writers and actors.

Films are under 15 minutes in length and Ireland based in theme or production. Film entries are in with the chance to win the Audience Choice Award or Directors Choice Award.

“The length of a film should be directly related to the endurance of the human bladder.” – Alfred Hitchcock

film devour

 

 

Contact us

The Black Box & Green Room Café
18-22 Hill Street | Belfast | BT1 2LA

Tel: +44 (0) 2890 244400

Registered Charity No: NIC100983

Supported by

Belfast City Council ACNI & Lotto John Hewitt Department for Communities Film Hub NI BFI Cinema Children In Need